What are the benefits of buying a domain name that has been recently expiring from the market?


There are several potential benefits to buying a domain name that has recently expired from the market:

  1. Established history: An expired domain may have already had an established history, which can include backlinks, indexed pages, and even search engine rankings. This can provide a head start in terms of SEO and give you a better chance of ranking well in search results.
  2. Brand recognition: An expired domain may already have some brand recognition, which can be beneficial if you are planning to launch a similar business or website. This could save you time and money in building brand awareness.
  3. Traffic: An expired domain may already have some traffic, which can be beneficial if you are planning to launch a similar business or website. This could save you time and money in building traffic.
  4. Age: An expired domain may be older than a newly registered one, and search engines tend to favor older domains over newer ones. This can help your website to rank better in search results.
  5. Cost: An expired domain may be cheaper than buying a new one, especially if the domain has a high value, such as a good keyword or a high search volume.

It’s worth noting that there is also a risk when buying expired domains, as some of them may have been used for spamming, black hat SEO or other illegal activities that can penalize your site. It’s recommended to check the domain history and be sure that the domain wasn’t used for any illegal activities before buying it.

What are the best tools to check the domain name history in the past if you want to buy a domain name?


Before buying a new domain name, it’s important to check its history to ensure that it has not been used for any malicious or illegal activities. Here are some of the best tools to check domain history:

  1. WHOIS Lookup: WHOIS is a publicly available database that contains information about domain ownership and registration. You can use a WHOIS lookup tool such as whois.com to see the current and past owners of a domain, as well as its registration and expiration date.
  2. Wayback Machine: The Wayback Machine is a digital archive of the internet that allows you to view the history of a website. You can use the Wayback Machine to see how a website looked in the past and check for any previous content that may be inappropriate.
  3. Google Search: You can use Google Search to find information about a domain’s history. Simply search for the domain name and look for any articles, blog posts, or other content that may mention the domain.
  4. DomainTools: DomainTools is a comprehensive tool that provides information on domain names, including WHOIS data, historical data, and IP information. It allows you to check the domain’s history, such as the past ownership, DNS records, and historical DNS data.
  5. Archive.org: Similar to the Wayback Machine, Archive.org allows you to view the history of a website by taking snapshots of the website over time. You can use it to check the domain’s history and see how it has changed over time.

It’s important to note that these tools can provide useful information, but they may not have a complete history of the domain name, so it’s good to use multiple tools to check the domain history.

What is DKIM?


DKIM, or DomainKeys Identified Mail, is a security measure that is used to verify the authenticity of an email and protect against spam, phishing, and other types of email fraud. In this blog post, we will explore what DKIM is, how it works, and why it is important for protecting your email system and your online reputation.

What is DKIM?

DKIM is an email authentication method that allows the person or organization sending an email to associate a digital signature with the email. The signature is created using a private key and is attached to the email in the form of a DKIM-Signature header. The signature is then verified by the recipient’s email server using a public key that is stored in a DKIM record in the domain’s DNS.

How does DKIM work?

When an email is sent, the sender’s mail server adds a DKIM-Signature header to the email that includes the digital signature. The header also includes information about the domain, the selector (a unique string that is used to identify the key pair), and the algorithm that was used to create the signature.

When the email is received, the recipient’s email server retrieves the public key from the sender’s DKIM record in the DNS and uses it to verify the signature. If the signature is valid, it means that the email has not been tampered with during transit and can be trusted. If the signature is invalid, it means that the email may have been altered or forged and may not be trustworthy.

Why is DKIM important?

DKIM is important for a few reasons:

  1. It helps protect against spam and phishing attacks: Spammers and phishers often try to send email from fake domains or domains that they don’t have permission to use. By implementing DKIM, you can ensure that only emails that have been signed with your domain’s private key are trusted, which can help to reduce the risk of spam and phishing attacks.
  2. It helps protect your online reputation: When emails sent from your domain are flagged as spam or rejected, it can harm your online reputation. This can lead to decreased deliverability rates and make it more difficult for you to reach your intended audience. By implementing DKIM, you can help to ensure that legitimate emails from your domain are not flagged as spam, which can help to protect your online reputation.
  3. It can improve email deliverability: In addition to protecting your online reputation, DKIM can also help to improve the deliverability of your emails. When you have DKIM implemented, email servers are more likely to trust emails from your domain, which can help to improve the chances that your emails will reach their intended recipients.

How do I set up DKIM?

Setting up DKIM involves the following steps:

  1. Generate a private/public key pair. This can be done using a tool such as OpenSSL.
  2. Publish the public key in your domain’s DNS as a TXT record. The record should include the following information:
  • The domain name (e.g. example.com)
  • The selector (a unique string that is used to identify the key pair)
  • The public key
  1. Configure your mail server to sign outgoing emails with the private key. This can typically be done through the server’s administrative panel or by modifying the server’s configuration files.
  2. Test the implementation to ensure that the signatures are being added to outgoing emails and that they are being verified by recipient servers.

In conclusion, DKIM is an important security measure that helps to protect against spam, phishing, and other types of email fraud.

Why SPF records are important in email security


SPF records are an important aspect of email security and are used to prevent spam and phishing attacks. In this blog post, we will explore what SPF records are, how they work, and why they are essential for protecting your email system and your online reputation.

What are SPF records?

SPF records, or Sender Policy Framework records, are DNS records that identify which mail servers are authorized to send email on behalf of a domain. These records are used by email servers to verify the authenticity of the sender’s domain and ensure that the email is not a spam or phishing attempt.

How do SPF records work?

When an email is sent, the recipient’s email server checks the sender’s SPF record to determine if the server that sent the email is authorized to do so. The SPF record includes a list of IP addresses and domain names that are allowed to send email on behalf of the domain. If the sending server’s IP address is not on the list, the email may be flagged as spam or rejected entirely.

For example, if you own the domain example.com and you have an SPF record that lists the IP address of your mail server as authorized to send email on behalf of your domain, any email sent from that server will pass the SPF check. However, if an email is sent from a server with a different IP address, the SPF check will fail and the email may be flagged as spam or rejected.

Why are SPF records important?

SPF records are important for a few reasons:

  1. They help protect against spam and phishing attacks: Spammers and phishers often try to send email from fake domains or domains that they don’t have permission to use. By implementing an SPF record, you can ensure that only authorized servers are able to send email on behalf of your domain, which can help to reduce the risk of spam and phishing attacks.
  2. They help protect your online reputation: When emails sent from your domain are flagged as spam or rejected, it can harm your online reputation. This can lead to decreased deliverability rates and make it more difficult for you to reach your intended audience. By implementing an SPF record, you can help to ensure that legitimate emails from your domain are not flagged as spam, which can help to protect your online reputation.
  3. They can improve email deliverability: In addition to protecting your online reputation, SPF records can also help to improve the deliverability of your emails. When you have an SPF record in place, email servers are more likely to trust emails from your domain, which can help to improve the chances that your emails will reach their intended recipients.

How do I set up an SPF record?

Setting up an SPF record is relatively simple and can be done in a few steps:

  1. Identify the servers that are authorized to send email on behalf of your domain. This can include your own mail servers, as well as any third-party servers that you use (such as a marketing automation platform).
  2. Create a list of the IP addresses and domains that are authorized to send email on behalf of your domain.
  3. Create an SPF record using the list of authorized servers. The record should include the following information:
  • The domain name (e.g. example.com)
  • The SPF record type (e.g. TXT)
  • The SPF record value (e.g. v=spf1 a mx ip4:1.2.3.4 include:thirdpartyserver.com -all)
  1. Publish the SPF record

Why you should have a Dmarc record in the DNS of your domainname


Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance (DMARC) is a security protocol that helps protect email senders and recipients from spam and phishing attacks. It works by verifying that an email message is legitimate and actually sent from the domain it claims to be sent from. If an email fails DMARC evaluation, it can be flagged as suspicious or rejected outright.

As the prevalence of email phishing attacks continues to grow, it is more important than ever for businesses and organizations to implement DMARC in their domain names. Here are just a few reasons why DMARC is so important:

  1. Protect your brand reputation

Phishing attacks can damage your brand reputation in a number of ways. For example, if a customer receives a fake email claiming to be from your company and falls for the scam, they may lose trust in your business and be less likely to do business with you in the future. Additionally, if your brand is associated with phishing attacks, it can damage your reputation and lead to decreased customer trust. Implementing DMARC can help protect your brand reputation by reducing the likelihood of phishing attacks using your domain.

  1. Reduce spam and phishing in your inbox

DMARC helps to reduce spam and phishing emails in your inbox by allowing you to set policies for how to handle messages that fail DMARC evaluation. For example, you can choose to reject or quarantine these messages, helping to keep your inbox clean and free of potentially malicious content.

  1. Improve email deliverability

In addition to protecting your brand reputation and reducing spam and phishing in your inbox, implementing DMARC can also improve your email deliverability. When your emails pass DMARC evaluation, they are more likely to be delivered to the recipient’s inbox, rather than being flagged as spam or rejected altogether. This can be particularly important for businesses that rely on email marketing or use email as a primary form of communication with customers.

  1. Increase security for your customers

By implementing DMARC, you can help protect your customers from phishing attacks and other malicious activity. This can not only improve customer trust in your business, but it can also reduce the likelihood of your customers falling victim to a phishing attack.

So, how do you implement DMARC in your domain name? First, you will need to publish a DMARC record in your domain’s DNS. This record specifies the policies for handling messages that fail DMARC evaluation, as well as where to send reports on messages that pass or fail DMARC evaluation.

Next, you will need to set up SPF (Sender Policy Framework) and DKIM (DomainKeys Identified Mail) for your domain. SPF is a protocol that helps verify that an email was actually sent by the domain it claims to be sent from, while DKIM uses a digital signature to verify the authenticity of an email. Both of these protocols are used by DMARC to determine whether or not an email message is legitimate.

Once you have set up SPF and DKIM, you can then monitor your DMARC reports to ensure that your email messages are passing DMARC evaluation. You can use tools like Google’s DMARC Analyzer to help you monitor and analyze your DMARC reports.

In conclusion, implementing DMARC in your domain name is crucial for protecting your brand reputation, reducing spam and phishing in your inbox, improving email deliverability, and increasing security for your customers. By taking the time to set up DMARC, SPF, and DKIM, you can help ensure that your emails are legitimate and protect your business and customers from phishing attacks.

Domain Opportunities for Agencies



dot-agency

With the new gTLD program maturing after the introduction of around 1000 new possible extensions besides .com I think it is good to look at some opportunities that are especially interesting for Agencies. When I say Agencies I mean webdesigners, webdevelopers, marketing agencies, media bureaus, advertising agencies, e-commerce companies etc etc.

In the new gTLD space are so many good ideas for domain names or company names still available, especially for Agencies. What to think of these new gTLDs:

  • .design
  • .media
  • .marketing
  • .agency
  • .sale
  • .website
  • .shop
  • .site
  • .online

And these are just a few options for these specific organisations. For many vertical markets there are a lot of different other options.

With an Openprovider membership starting at € 49,00 you can buy them for registry costprice. See https://lp.openprovider.com/ntld-plan-xs-size for more details.

 

Being Unique in the Domain Name business


What to do when your product is the same as with anybody else in the market?
What to do when you do not really add value to the products you sell?
What to do when margins are going down?
What to do when everybody is after your customers and you after theirs and the market is growing very slowly?
What to do when you have the ambition to be a large player in this kind of market?
What to do if many of your suppliers are monopolies and feel no competitive pressure at all?

Kind of challenging isn’t it?

Welcome to the domain registrar business….

Being a domain name registrar is not an easy business. The market is definitely a so-called Red Ocean with a lot of commoditisation.

Red-Ocean-vs-Blue-Ocean-Strategy

What did we do to survive and grow and move from the Red to the Blue Ocean?

– We hired more software developers. Currently our software development team is one of the largest in the industry and growing. Innovation is essential and without maximising our investments in the future in order to serve our customers in the best possible way we cannot survive.

– We changed to a unique business model. We charge a yearly fixed fee for the usage of our platform and do not charge any margin on the most common domain names anymore. You get our registry costprice, which in many cases is much lower than you could get yourself. This is very unique and a revolutionary model where customers pay for the value we add and do not pay where we do not add value.

– Everything we do is focussed on saving our customers time and money and to help them grow their business by providing them tools for up-selling and cross-selling to their own customers.

– We invest a lot in our support. Currently we provide support in English, Dutch, Spanish, Catalan and Russian. Our support team gets on average more then a 9 out of 10 from our customers.

– We align our people’s personal goals in life with the company goals and make sure they have autonomy, mastery and purpose in everything they do. Give people the right motivation and they can change the world.

As you can see Openprovider is all about People and Software to help you grow combined with a Unique Businessmodel .

We only need to let the world know we exist ….

 

 

Opportunities for marketeers with new gTLDs and why ICANN uses Openprovider


What have we seen since the launch of the new gTLD program?

The new generic Top Level Domain (gTLD) program is around for almost two years and several hundreds of new gTLDs have been launched. So far the number of registrations have not been spectacular and far less than the industry expected them to be. Does this mean the whole idea was a failure? I don’t think so. The industry does not really have many companies with great marketing and sales power. In order to drive demand it is totally necessary to do some marketing and sales efforts. Many registries expected miracles to happen by simply offering new gTLDs. Unfortunately miracles do not happen a lot. Some registries like .xyz at least made a great effort in marketing their domains. They were able to register almost one million domains and they are a good alternative for a .com domain. Also the Chinese gTLDs do pretty well. Four of those Chinese IDNs are in the top 30 of most successful new gTLDS. I expect that many IDN based domains will do relatively well in the future. For Arabs, Chinese, Japanese, Russian and many other people that do not use Latin letters the new gTLD program is very interesting. For the first time in the history of the internet they are able to use the internet completely in their own language. Some other registries have been very successful with the total amount of domain registrations they have done. Donuts for example has registered almost 25% of all the new domains that are currently available. Although they also expected much more they still have done very well.

The regional new gTLDs like .nyc and .berlin have done an excellent job. And for some registries unexpected successes happened. Afilias never expected .kim to do so well in Turkey. In the Turkish language ‘kim’ means ‘who’.

Marketeers will use a lot of new gTLDs in 2016

I think in 2016 marketeers will really start using the new gTLDs to do marketing campaigns. For SEO and SEA a relevant and specific domain name is very important and in the new gTLD space many of those domains are still available. And Google, Bing, Baidu and Yandex are indexing those new domains very well. We can expect to see very interesting campaigns for certain regions using the new gTLDs as the domain name. If you want to market something in Wales you probably better use a .wales domain name than a .co.uk or .com and when your target audience is in New York the .nyc domain will be seen more and more in advertising campaigns.
Also in sports there are a lot of opportunities to use a .tennis or .football domain name for promotional activities aimed at specific sports. In the financial sector a short and specific .loan or .credit domain are much more powerful to use in a campaign than a very long .com domain.

If you are interested in ideas you can get an overview per category of domains at Openprovider.

Why did ICANN choose Openprovider?

Many domain registrars have decided not to implement all new gTLDs because the demand is too low and the effort to implement all of them is very high. ICANN wanted to test all new registries and the performance of the new gTLD program. However they found out that going directly to a all registries for registering their own ICANN domains was not very practical and they decided to find a registrar. The shortlist of registrars offering all new gTLDs was also very small. Openprovider is one those registrars and had just passed the first audit that ICANN did on compliance with the contractual obligations. Furthermore ICANN finds our business model where we charge a relatively small yearly subscription fee for our platform and register all new gTLDs at registry cost price plus ICANN fee very interesting. With the help we offered in registering the domains for them it was a win-win situation. ICANN was helped in a very efficient and cost effective way and we got the acknowledgement that our investments in the new gTLD program and our business model are future proof.